Tag: ORB Lab

Atlantic sturgeon arriving earlier in the mid-Atlantic

The unusually warm conditions in the winter and spring of 2012 have resulted in water temperatures up to 3°C warmer than the previous 3 years resulting in comparable Atlantic sturgeon catches off the coast of Delaware occurring 3 weeks earlier than past sampling efforts.  During sampling events for Atlantic sturgeon we have also documented sand tiger sharks arriving off the coast of Delaware in late-March, a full month earlier than documented in previous seasons.

My research, conducted jointly with Dewayne Fox at Delaware State University and Matt Oliver at the University of Delaware, is focused on coastal movements and habitat use of adult Atlantic sturgeon during the marine phase of their life history.  By utilizing acoustic biotelemetry on both traditional fixed array platforms as well as developing mobile array platforms coupled with Mid-Atlantic Regional Association for Coastal Ocean Observing Systems (MARACOOS) I am going to model Atlantic sturgeon distributions in a dynamic coastal marine environment.  This research is particularly relevant given the recent protection of Atlantic sturgeon under the Endangered Species Act.  Determining factors influencing Atlantic sturgeon movements and distributions during their marine migrations will enable dynamic management strategies to reduce mortalities as well as impacts to commercial fisheries, dredging efforts, and vessel traffic.  In addition to allowing for dynamic management strategies the development of models for adult Atlantic sturgeon movements and distributions in relation to dynamic environmental conditions will illustrate how changing environmental conditions are going to impact this Endangered Species moving forward.

Graduate student Matt Breece with a recently telemetered female Atlantic sturgeon off the coast of Delaware

Hurricane Katia Footprints

The ORB Lab was having a meeting in the GVis Lab this week and, as usual, the East Coast US 8-Day Averaged Sea Surface Temperature overlay was up on the screens. Dr. Oliver pointed to the screen and noted that there was a path cutting across the Gulf Stream that was cooler than usual and that it was probably due to upwelling and mixing from hurricane Katia. Sure enough, we loaded up a layer showing Katia’s track and they lined up.

Katia SST Trail

Katia SST Trail

We then checked to see if there was anything noticeable on the East Coast US 8-Day Average Chlorophyll layer and you can see what appears to be a slight bloom in chlorophyll along the track as well (slightly lighter blue).

Katia Cholorophyll Trail

Katia Cholorophyll Trail

Another neat view is the markedly cooler water that you flowing into the bays from the increased river discharge that resulted from the large amounts of rain dropped by hurricane Katia and tropical storm Lee as they passed through.

Cold river water 20110913

Cold river water 20110913

These layers and several others are processed and uploaded daily and made available via the Orb Lab website in the Public Access section. They are exposed via Google Maps interfaces as well as Google Earth embedded views and linkable KMZ file formats. Neat stuff!

NASATweetup Mission Accomplished

Welcome Home Flat Samantha!

Samanthas and Astronaut Greg Johnson

Samanthas and Astronaut Greg Johnson

Everything has finally come full circle and Flat Samantha is once again re-united with her creator Samantha. Calling @FlatSamantha‘s trip a “circle” might be a bit of a misnomer however as she has had a wild adventure over the last couple of months. Her journey started in April when young Samantha found out that I was selected to attend the #NASATweetup for the final launch of the space shuttle Endeavour (#STS134). Samantha (and all the rest of the students in the lab) were disappointed that they couldn’t come with me to watch this historic launch, and Samantha took matters (and scissors and markers) into her own two hands and created a flat adventurer that she named Flat Samantha. She asked me if Flat Samantha could ride with me to the Endeavour launch and go up in the shuttle to the International Space Station. I would have loved to say “yes” but I had to inform Samantha that time was too short and that I could only take her down to watch the shuttle launch, but that I would take lots of pictures of her during this adventure and let her share them via a Twitter account that was set up for her (after all, she was going down to a NASATweetup – how’s a girl to tweet if she doesn’t have an account ;?).

I emailed Stephanie Schierholz that I would like to bring along another #NASATweetup attendee and that she wouldn’t take up any extra space. Without batting an eye Ms. Schierholz said “no problem, I’ll have a #NASATweetup badge waiting for her as well”.

FlatSamantha STS134 NASATWeetup Badge

FlatSamantha STS134 NASATWeetup Badge

The original launch date for the shuttle was adjusted forward as there was a conflict between when the Endeavour would be at the ISS and when the Soyuz 25S capsule would be there with some time sensitive experiments. It just so happened that the new launch date fell during my sons spring break period at school, so we scheduled a family vacation to Orlando prior to the launch and had a blast sharing the road trip down and the theme park adventures with Flat Samantha prior to the new launch date. I took her over to the Kennedy Space Center for the #STS134 #NASATweetup where we enjoyed the many presentations that the fine people at NASA had arranged for us on day #1 and then came back for what ended up being a scrubbed launch on day #2 (see: “STS-134 NASATweetup is only half over“).

We sat in the tent waiting for the hundreds of thousands of other disappointed spectators that were parked outside the Kennedy Space Center to head home after the launch scrub, knowing that it would be a couple of hours at least before the roads would be passable. As we chatted amongst ourselves, I started talking with Beth Beck and she asked me about the back story on my flat companion. I told her about Samantha and how she would like to have seen Flat Samantha go into space and that I could only promise to get her to the NASATweetup event to watch the launch. Ms. Beck said that since the launch was scrubbed, that there might be a possibility to fulfill Samantha’s wishes and that she would get back to me. Sure enough, a few days later I got an email from her saying that one of the astronauts – Gregory Johnson (aka @Astro_Box) said that he would do what he could to get @FlatSamantha into space. True to his word, we received a picture from space of one @FlatSamantha in the cupola of the International Space Station.

Flat Samantha in the ISS Cupola (photo by Gregory Johnson)

Flat Samantha in the ISS Cupola (photo by Gregory Johnson)

Upon the Endeavour’s return, Flat Samantha was escorted to a couple of other NASA Tweetup events including the #NASATweetup for the Sophia Telescope, the @NASAJPL Tweetup by @Schierholz and even the historic landing of the space shuttle Atlantis #STS135 with @BethBeck. Being flat and portable makes it much easier to get invited to some pretty awesome events it seems.

The title of this post is “NASATweetup Mission Accomplished” because the journey home to creator Samantha was accomplished this past week. The journey home was not via a FedEx envelope or the like, however. Flat Samantha was escorted home and hand-delivered by none other than astronaut Gregory Johnson while he was on the east coast giving a mission debriefing to NASA empoyees at NASA HQ in DC. Samantha, her parents and myself were invited to attend the debriefing and to meet with @Astro_Box for some photos following the debriefing by the ever awesome Beth Beck. When the University of Delaware’s ORB Lab students (who were anxiously following @FlatSamantha’s adventure) found out about the trip, they asked if they could come too. I asked Ms. Beck whether that was possible and not only did she say “yes” but she provided the entire group with reserved up-front seating for the debrief!

NASA HQ Debrief

NASA HQ Debrief (photo by Beth Beck)

I want to give a heart-felt thank you to Stephanie Schierholz and Beth Beck for allowing us all to join @FlatSamantha in her whirlwind adventure, both via Twitter and in person. I would also like to thank Gregory Johnson for making not only one little girls wish come true by bringing her flat proxy into space, but for also taking time out of his incredibly busy schedule to bring that excitement to our small group of students and the rest of the world. The employees and representatives of NASA embody the compassion, the “can do” attitude and the educational and outreach expertise that the rest of us should pay close attention to. We are all honored to have been included in these adventures and their memories that we will carry with us for a lifetime. Rocket On NASA!

Group Photo with Greg Johnson and Flat Samantha (photo by Beth Beck)

Group Photo with Greg Johnson and Flat Samantha (photo by Beth Beck)

PS – All of the Flat Samantha #STS134 #NASATweetup adventure photos have been uploaded to the Flat Samantha Ocean Bytes media gallery – enjoy!

A Wind Turbine Experience

Luckily Blaise Sheridan is not afraid of heights, as he climbs up the UD 2-megawatt wind turbine for the second time. With his Master’s thesis revolving around wind energy, he is one of only four people from UD certified to climb the turbine. Although there is an elevator (more technically termed a personnel or ‘man’ lift), it can only be used by those who take a more intensive 4-day training course. Instead, a 2-day Fall Protection/Competent Climber class was taken by two facilities employees (Don Smith and Rodney McGee), as well as two UD students (Blaise and DeAnna Sewell). With this course under their belt, they can climb the ladder to the top of the 256-foot-tall-turbine. For their safety, they are always connected to a guide wire that clips onto the cable grab of each climbers harness. The cable ensures that if a climber falls they will only drop less than a foot.

 This goal of this trip was to string up 3 cables to install bat microphones. The microphones will allow researchers to see how often bats pass around the turbine. This anticipated one-day job ended up taking about 2.5 days due to lightning and the large amount of on site planning that needed to take place. With the help of a Gamesa contractor, Blaise and Rodney were able to install the research equipment while the contractor performed routine maintenance and provided his expert guidance.

The turbine is currently producing more electricity than projected, although how much more is still being studied. On average, it produces more energy than the university needs, which makes the excess available to the town!

Inside the nacelle, the bus sized structure on the top of the tower where all the interesting mechanical and electrical components are housed, Blaise notes,  “It must be at least 120 degrees” from the waste heat given off by the electrical transformers, not to mention all the gearboxes, friction and the fact that heat rises up the turbine. But, outside, on top of the nacelle, there’s enough airflow to cool you off! Blaise admits it can be very tiring to climb but the incredible view from the top is worth it. He discloses his favorite part is to watch the wake off the boats coming into Roosevelt Inlet. With the hope of additional renewable energy options in the future,  “It’s still very novel for a university to have this turbine and its been a once in a life time experience…one to check off the bucket list.  Not to mention it’s a great bar story.”

Timelapse of a Day in the ORB Lab’s GVis Room

I was showing the students how to operate the “birdcam” so they can use it to record a series of stills to create a time lapse video of an upcoming research cruise on the RV Hugh R Sharp. We left the birdcam in the corner and let it click away all day, shooting a new still every minute and the video above is the resulting masterpiece. It is embedded from “The UD ORB Lab” channel on YouTube.

You can learn more about the “birdcam” in a previous post about “Timelapse Video on the Cheap“. The GVis Room pictured above is the “Global Visualization Room” that was described in the post “How to Construct a Global Visualization Lab“.

Thanks to the ORB Lab crew for sharing!

 

Flat Stanley Rides a REMUS in Antarctica

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=09uzDjDOmjo

Flat Stanley joined researchers at Palmer Station in Antarctica in search of penguins and environmental data about their feeding grounds in January.  This video showcases just how awesome this icon of international literacy and community can be. Armed with only a minimal amount of training, Flat Stanley managed to pilot a REMUS Autonomous Underwater Vehicle in a precision pattern through the frigid waters off the West Antarctic Peninsula  — gathering vital information that will allow scientists to understand the feeding habits of Antarctic penguin species.

You can see a map about the many locations this worldly traveler has gone and find out more about the Flat Stanley Project on their website. Many thanks to student travel coordinators at Sierra Canyon School in Chatsworth, CA for helping Flat Stanley make his way this far south.

Awesome job Stanley!

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